Investigación en pregrado: interés según sexo y ciclo académico

Translated title of the contribution: Undergraduate research: Interest by sex and academic cycle

J. Jhonnel Alarco, Guillermo Changllio-Calle, Mabel Cahuana-Salazar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Peru is considered the South American country with the lowest projection of scientific production in 2015, a strategy to reverse this situation is to keep the interest in research through participation in scientific societies of medical students. Objective To Determine the scientific research interest in medical students and their variation by sex and academic cycles. Method Cross-sectional study, conducted in 341 medical students from the Universidad Nacional San Luis Gonzaga de Ica, Peru. All participants received a questionnaire designed to collect information on the interest in drafting, participation, scientific publishing, and the interest to make a career in research in the future. Results Students showed a high interest in scientific research (>80%), however, when we asked if they wanted to make a career in research in the future, only 53.9% responded affirmatively. This interest decreases according increasing the academic cycles (p = 0.0532), and is higher in women (p = 0.1623). When grouped in preclinical and clinical sciences academic cycles the interest in participating in sciences events among clinical was lower (p = 0.0199). Women showed a high interest in writing scientific papers (p = 0.0031). Conclusions Medical students showed a high interest in scientific research, however, this decreases with the increasing of academic cycles.

Translated title of the contributionUndergraduate research: Interest by sex and academic cycle
Original languageSpanish
Pages (from-to)67-73
Number of pages7
JournalEducacion Medica
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Undergraduate research: Interest by sex and academic cycle'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this