Discriminação percebida como barreira para o adequado tratamento de doenças crônicas em migrantes venezuelanos do peru

Translated title of the contribution: Perceived discrimination as a barrier for the adequate treatment of chronic diseases in venezuelan migrants from peru

Carolina Delgado-Flores, Oscar Soto Cutire, Aleksandar Cvetkovic-Vega, Wendy Nieto-Gutierrez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine the association between perceived discrimination and receiving adequate treatment for chronic diseases in Venezuelan migrants. Methodology: A cross-sectional study was performed. This is a secondary analysis of the ENPOVE national survey from Peru. The association between the perceived discrimination and receiving adequate treatment for chronic diseases was evaluated using a Poisson regression model, considering the adjusted effect of the multistage sampling. Results: A total of 865 migrants were evaluated (age: 36.6 ± 0.7 years and 58.2% women). Of these, 54.8% perceived discrimination, and 89.2% did not receive adequate treatment for chronic diseases. Perceived discrimination was significantly associated with a lower prevalence of receiving adequate treatment for chronic diseases (PRa = 0.49; 95%CI 0.25 – 0.97). Conclusion: This study evidenced that perceived discrimination decreases the prevalence of receiving adequate treatment for chronic diseases by approximately 50% compared with those who did not perceive discrimination.

Translated title of the contributionPerceived discrimination as a barrier for the adequate treatment of chronic diseases in venezuelan migrants from peru
Original languagePortuguese
Article numberE210029
JournalRevista Brasileira de Epidemiologia
Volume24
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Chronic disease
  • Emigrants and immigrants
  • Peru
  • Public health
  • Therapeutics
  • Venezuela

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