Antibacterial efficacy of non-thermal atmospheric plasma against Streptococcus mutans biofilm grown on the surfaces of restorative resin composites

Gabriel Nima, Erika Harth-Chu, Rochelle Denise Hiers, Vanessa Gallego Arias Pecorari, David W. Dyer, Sharukh Soli Khajotia, Marcelo Giannini, Fernando Luis Esteban Florez

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2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of non-thermal atmospheric plasma (NTAP) against Streptococcus mutans biofilms. Resin discs were fabricated, wet-polished, UV sterilized, and immersed in water for monomer extraction (37 °C, 24 h). Biofilms of bioluminescent S. mutans strain JM10 was grown on resin discs in anaerobic conditions for (37 °C, 24 h). Discs were divided into seven groups: control (CON), 2% chlorhexidine (CHX), only argon gas 150 s (ARG) and four NTAP treatments (30 s, 90 s, 120 s, 150 s). NTAP was applied using a plasma jet device. After treatment, biofilms were analyzed through the counting of viable colonies (CFU), bioluminescence assay (BL), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All NTAP-treated biofilm yielded a significant CFU reduction when compared to ARG and CON. BL values showed that NTAP treatment for 90 s, 120 s or 150 s resulted in statistically significantly lower metabolic activity when compared to the other groups. CHX displayed the lowest means of CFU and BL. SEM showed significant morphological changes in NTAP-treated biofilm. PCR indicated damage to the DNA structure after NTAP treatment. NTAP treatment was effective in lowering the viability and metabolism of S. mutans in a time-dependent manner, suggesting its use as an intraoral surface-decontamination strategy.

Original languageEnglish
Article number23800
JournalScientific Reports
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021
Externally publishedYes

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